MÁRK FÉLEGYHÁZI
Assistant Professor
Laboratory of Cryptography and Systems Security (CrySyS)
Department of Networked Systems and Services (HIT)
Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME)

address: BME-HIT, PO Box 91, 1521 Budapest, Hungary
phone: +36 1 463 2047,     fax: +36 1 463 3263
e-mail: m247felegy2637hazi@crysys39.hu (Humans, please remove ALL the numbers!)
office: I.E. 418

publications · talks · teaching · CV (pdf, 2012.02.03)

Short bio: Márk received the M.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME), Hungary in 2001, and earned the Ph.D. degree from EPFL (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology -- Lausanne), Switzerland in 2007. From 1999 to 2001, he was a student member of the Traffic Lab at Ericsson Research, Hungary working with Dr. György Miklós, Dr. András Rácz and Dr. Andras Valkó. From 2001 to 2007, he worked in the group of Prof. Jean-Pierre Hubaux in the Laboratory of Computer Communications and Applications at EPFL. In 2008, he was a postdoctoral researcher in the network economics group led by Prof. Jean Walrand at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at UC Berkeley. In 2009-2010, he was a postdoctoral researcher in the network security group of Prof. Vern Paxson at the International Computer Science Institute (ICSI) Since 2006, he is an associate member of the Laboratory of Cryptography and Systems Security (CrySyS) at Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME), Hungary, where he currently holds the title of assistant professor.

Márk studies incentive problems in computer networks with a special focus on network security. As an assistant professor at Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME), his research interest covers both the system aspect of secure computing and the corresponding incentives of network participants. He recently initiated a project on risk management with a specific emphasis on the security of future Internet architectures. As a postdoctoral researcher at the International Computer Science Institute (ICSI), he has been studying the infrastructure used by spammers. With his colleagues, he proposed a proactive mechanism to detect domain names likely to be used in malicious activities. Previously at UC Berkeley, he focused on security policy issues, notably on cyber-insurance to manage security risks and reliable incident attribution. During his graduate research at EPFL, he worked on reputation-based key revocation, on reputation systems based on game theory to avoid denial of service in wireless ad hoc networks and on incentive-aware network design for various wireless networks. His earlier work at Ericsson Research wireless network design and implementation for Mobile IP protocol and Bluetooth.